English for job interviews

Your CV has just passed the first round and you are preparing for the job interview. Are you a little bit nervous since this interview will be conducted in English? Don’t worry, this little E-book will give you a hand.

English For Job Interviews includes not only useful information for your interview (common questions and sample answers) but also gives you a glance at the English language skills that should be used. Along with the language skills, polishing up your soft skills is a must, so don’t forget to check out the list of Dos and Don’ts at the end of this e-book. Once you are well-prepared, head to the interview and nail it! Good luck

Building a great resume is the first step in landing your dream job! The main purpose of your resume is to gain an employer’s interest so they contact you for an interview. The information you include on your resume, combined with how you present that information, will determine whether or not you get that initial contact. Typically, your resume has only a few seconds to impress the employer.

They will be making a judgment about you based on the content, format, language, grammar, and tone of your resume. Therefore, it is important to understand what employers are expecting from a resume as well as what they are looking for in a candidate. Your resume should be an honest representation of your skills, qualifications, and experiences.

It should be clear, concise, and targeted to the job opportunity for which you are applying. Although there are many resources devoted to resume writing and many opinions on how to construct the “perfect” resume, there are some basic fundamentals of writing a successful resume. Below are general guidelines on content and format that will help you write a strong, effective resume.

Personal Information

– Name: If you go by a nickname, include it with your full name. For example Crystal (Chrissy) Edwards or Qi “Patrick” Chen

– Address: Use your local address. If you have a permanent address, you can list it as well but only if you expect to be contacted there.

– Phone: Include a phone number where you can be reached reliably and where employers can leave messages. Remember to change your outgoing voicemail message to something appropriate and professional.

– Website: If you have a personal website, you can include it only if it pertains solely to your career objectives (i.e. you are a graphic designer and have an online portfolio). Remember that no other personal information should be included on your resume (i.e. your birthday, social security number, license, etc.).

– Email: Include an email address that you check frequently. The address should be professional (i.e. nothing that could be considered offensive or inappropriate) and should be available throughout your job search.

– Education: Include the institution name, city, and state, as well as your degree, major, minor, any areas of concentration, and date of graduation. You can also include study abroad experience as well as any relevant coursework, projects, research papers, academic scholarships, honors, licensing, special training, and/or credentials.

– Objective: Your objective statement should be clear, concise, and targeted to the job position.

– Experience: List your work experience in reverse chronological order (i.e. your most recent job should come first). Include all full-time, part-time, summer, and/or military positions, including internships and co-ops. You can list experience even if you weren’t paid for it. For each job, include the start and end dates, name of the employer with location (city and state only), and your position title. Use the present tense for work you are currently doing and use past tense for previous work.

– Additional Information: You can also include other information that is relevant to the job for which you are applying. These sections can include extra-curricular activities, leadership experience, community service/volunteer work, language skills, computer skills, professional associations, research, publications, recognitions, and awards.

Here is what not to include on your resume: the word “Resume” at the top of your resume, personal information (such as social security number, drivers license, demographic information, etc.), salary information, the full address of employer, names of supervisors, reasons for leaving jobs, and references.

Dressing for Interviews

Before you say a single word to the interviewer and you have already made an impression based on how you’re dressed. The guidelines given hereunder are commonly accepted as appropriate for interviewing. Every company has a different dress code; how you dress at the job may have very little to do with how you dress for an interview.

Men

Dress in a manner that is professionally appropriate to the position for which you are applying. In almost all cases, this means wearing a suit. It is rarely appropriate to “dress down” for an interview, regardless of company dress code rule. When in doubt, go conservative.

Clothing should be neat, clean, and pressed. If you don’t have an iron, either buy one or be prepared to visit the dry-cleaners often. Shower or bathe the morning of the interview. Wear deodorant. Don’t wear cologne or aftershave. You don’t want to smell overpowering or worse, cause an allergic reaction.

Your suit should be comfortable and fit you well so that you look and act your best. There is a difference between not yet feeling at ease in a suit and trying to fit into the same suit you wore to your sister’s wedding when you were 15. (In the latter case, it’s time to invest in a new suit!).

You should wear a suit to interviews. “Suit” means the works: a matching jacket and pants, a dress shirt, tie, coordinating socks, and dress shoes. A dark-colored suit with a light-colored shirt is your best option.

“Make sure you have fresh breath. Brush your teeth before you leave for the interview, and don’t eat before the interview. Don’t smoke right before an interview”. Your hair should be neat, clean, and conservative. Avoid loud colors and flashy ties.

Woman

Generally, you should wear a suit with a skirt or pants. When in doubt, be more conservative. Make-up and nail polish should be understated and flattering; shades that are neutral to your skin tone are generally advisable. Avoid bright or unusual colors or very long nails.

Interview suits should be simple and dark in color. Anything tight, bright, short, or sheer should absolutely be avoided. (Interviewers have been known to complain about the length of interviewees’ skirts; if you have any doubts, it’s probably too short.) Knee-length skirts are suggested. Very long skirts, while modest, are also considered too trendy for an interview.

Your suit should be comfortable and fit you well; if your waistband is cutting you in half or your jacket is too tight, you won’t look or act your best. Some stores offer free alterations when you purchase a suit, or you may want to find a tailor to adjust a suit you already own.

Shoes should be conservative and fairly low-heeled. They should be in reasonably good condition, not scuffed or run-down at the heels. Don’t wear shoes with an open toe or back; any shoes you would wear on a date or to a club are probably inappropriate. A basic pump is flattering, versatile, and will stay in style forever (once you own pumps, you can spend the rest of your money on fun shoes). The salesperson in the shoe store can steer you in the right direction.

Wear a conservative blouse with your suit. Do not wear bright colors, animal prints, or anything lacy, sheer, or low-cut. Keep your jewelry and hair accessories to a minimum, and stick to those that are not flashy, distracting, or shiny. One ring per hand is best.

Your hose should be neutral (matched to your skin tone). Make sure the heels are not dyed black from your shoes and that there are no snags or runs. Only use the nail polish trick in an emergency; you may want to carry an extra pair of hose with you instead.

“Your clothing should always be neat, clean, and pressed. If you don’t have an iron, either buy one or be prepared to visit the dry-cleaner’s often”. Your hair should be neat, clean, and conservatively styled. Banana clips, brightly-colored scrunchies or elastics, and cheerleader-type ponytails look out of place with a suit. You may want to wear your hair in an updo, pull it back into a low ponytail, or wear a barrette (this suggestion does not include the tiny little barrettes that only hold the front of your bangs back). The idea is to look polished and professional, not to advertise what a creative genius your hairdresser is.

Dress in a manner that is professionally appropriate to the position for which you are applying. In almost all cases, this means wearing a suit. It is rarely appropriate to “dress down” for an interview, regardless of company dress code policy. When in doubt, go conservative.

Make sure you have fresh breath. Brush your teeth before you leave for the interview, and don’t eat or smoke before the interview. Shower or bathe the morning of the interview. Wear deodorant. Don’t wear perfume: you don’t want to smell overpowering or worse, cause an allergic reaction.

 

Topica Native

You’re viewing the article:
English for job interviews
https://juggalonews.com/english-for-job-interviews-topica-native.html
Image by Sue Styles from Pixabay

Spread the love
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
  •  
error: Alert: Content is protected !!